Shark vs Kayak Tuna

Kingfish / Bonito Redemption

Something seems to be missing...

Something seems to be missing…

Shark vs Kayak Tuna
Kingfish / Bonito Redemption
By Mike Stevens

Mention kayak fishing offshore during casual conversation over dinner, and no less than half of your family is going to say “shark” within the next 10 seconds. The “we’re gonna need a bigger boat” image in their heads is the brand of shark attack they are thinking about, not the shark-versus-hooked-fish one that actually happens relatively often.

What you see in this video is how many of these scenarios play out, which is, the shark taking a bite toward the end of the fight. It’s an instinctive reaction that you see from salt and freshwater game fish alike. How many times have you seen a fish following your lure for what seems like forever only for it to strike toward the end before your offering escapes the underwater world he lives in?

It’s as if your target fish thinks “Well, I spent enough time following this thing, and it appears to be heading up and out of the water now, so I really need to make up my mind RIGHT NOW,” then you either get an aggressive strike, or a heartbreaking last-second denial. It certainly supports the idea that you should always fish your lure all the way back to the boat.

The trouble is, when it comes to a shark following the hooked fish that you have been battling, you WANT that denial rather than the strike that leaves you without a fish, or at least, with a portion of one.

Thankfully, the angler in this video fishing off of Dania Beach in Florida gets to redeem himself after losing a chunk of his tuna to a shark by managing to land a kingfish and a very nice bonito. He nearly scores a trifecta when a third fish strikes within seconds of landing the bonito, but that one would escape before the yaker gets a real chance to grab the rod and put the screws to it.

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